Item #755 1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...
1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...

1930s MISSIONARY PHOTO ALBUM SCRAPBOOK - CHINA, AFRICA, SOUTH AMERICA, etc...

Item #755

Twenty 9 x 12” loose pages with no covers, which were once bound from two holes along the top of these sheets. This scrapbook contains about 23 black-and-white photos and various ephemera from missionaries in South China, China, Arabia, Africa, Bolivia, Central America, Ethiopia, Egypt, Japan, India, Korea, Sumatra, and Alaska. The creator of the scrapbook focused on these various missions around the world, often naming the missionaries involved in that location, including Reverend and Mrs. Alvin S. Kruger, Viola L. Miller, Dr. Sarah L. Hosman Maskat, Reverend and Mrs. Frank Pickering, Bertha M. Schmidt, Marcella Ohman, and Mary Reed. The scrapbook creator mentions praying for the missionaries and brings up the fact that Oliver and Ruch Ekstrom died doing missionary work in Guatemala. A few of the pages note that the mission is sponsored or supported by the Bowmanville Congregation Church (which from an internet search, appears to be in Ontario, Canada). Throughout the scrapbook there are brochures from the area, including brochures about the South China Boat Mission and the New Morning Star Gospel Boat. Nearly every page also includes stamps from the area that the page represents. There are also clippings from other sources, colorful postcards, and cards or notes from fellow missionaries. Photos measure between 1.25 x 2.25” and 2.75 x 4.25” and are glued to the pages, most accompanied by detailed annotations. Some of these annotations come across as racist, commenting on the physical features of the indigenous peoples of the various countries.

Excerpt from “Some Personal Reminiscences of Miss Florence Drew, Founder of South China Boat Mission and Field Director for 23 Years By Her Brother, Rev. Edward Drew”
Talking over with her the mission work of Chicago, I made a chance remark, as it seemed to me then, but evidently God was in it. My sister was an expert stenographer and had then secured a good position. And my seemingly chance remark was this: “Why not try to secure a business position in one of the great English offices in Hong Kong and work in your spare time among the boats.” The idea seemed to take hold, and if I remember correctly, she answered, “I think I will.”
A year later she had saved sufficient for her fare to Hong Kong, and with a very small “outfit” and her precious typewriter she said good-bye. That was in the fall of 1909. She went forth without any promised support.
She had no trouble in getting a position, and plunged into the study of the Chinese language, and in three months was teaching children the way of salvation in their own tongue. She finally became adept in the difficult Chinese language. During the first year she opened two missions at the water’s edge and gave her spare time to the Boat People. But the Boat People would not come on land, and she found herself facing her first great difficulty.
When my sister had toiled one year in China I felt led of the Lord to join her; so in the fall of 1910 I too said good-bye to a few friends and sailed for China, arriving in January, 1911.
It was evident to us both that we must go onto the water with the gospel if we were to reach these strange people, for they are considered an outcast people by those living on land.
Hearing of a large American built boat for sale (about 100 feet long and with two decks) we investigated, arranged to purchase it, and began the real work of the South China Boat Mission in Canton.

Excerpt from scrapbook
The boat church in South China is very interesting. When the people wish to make a public confession of their faith in the Lord they collect all their heathen articles, idols and incense etc. and burn them in a big iron pot on the from of the Gospel Boat. Hymns of victory arise and the confessor lites the material as the heathen look on with fear and trembling. People round about have covered their faces as the flames leap up. But the boat christians are made stronger and rejoice with the angels in the victory. Right after this experience the believer is usually persecuted and very sorely tempted. Please pray for them and the christians. Some backsliders are hindering the work and thus the unbelievers do not turn to the Lord.

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