Item #618 CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL. HELEN DONOVAN.
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL
CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL

CELLIST HELEN DONOVAN SCRAPBOOK - BOSTON UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S COUNCIL

Item #618

Stuffed full, this 8 x 11.5” green string-bound scrapbook contains ephemera from the career of Helen Donovan, a cellist. The first page of the album reads: “Professional Scrapbook No. I Years - 1932-1934” although in fact the material within the scrapbook goes to 1935. Helen was a professional cellist and the scrapbook is filled with letters and programs for concerts and musical programs that she participated in. Many of these programs were for the Boston University Women’s Council “Six Plays for Children.” Aside from concert programs, there are also a couple of newspaper clippings and letters thanking Helen for her participation in musical programs. Several pages are loose/detached within the scrapbook and the pages are brittle.

Example letters and newspaper clippings:
Letter from John M. Rowell to Helen Donovan (March 10, 1932)
My dear Miss Donovan:
I want to thank you, and I wish you would thank in a formal way for me Miss Cunningham and Miss Davis, for the truly splendid program you gave us yesterday. The music was so well chosen and so beautifully rendered that it will leave a picture in our minds that will not soon fade away.
I do thank each one of you most cordially and will be glad to be of any help to anyone of you at any time. Will you please consider yourself as most cordially welcome to anything that we have at the Browne Junior High School.
Yours very sincerely,
John M. Rowell

Letter from Juanita Florence O’Hara to Helen Donovan (Nov. 25th, 1933)
My dear Miss Donovan :-
The New England Women’s Press Association certainly feels indebted to you for your kindness in coming to help celebrate its 49th Birthday last Wednesday afternoon, and it gives me pleasure to express to you its appreciation and thanks.
Most Cordially yours,
Juanita Florence O’Hara

“Aladdin” Delights Child Audiences
Perenially new and fascinating to children, the magic tale of “Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp,” was unfolded to a large audience of delighted youngsters yesterday morning and afternoon at the Repertory Theatre under auspices of the Boston University Women’s Council. It was the first production in the fourth season of six plays for children sponsored by the Council and acted by the Clare Tree Major Children’s Theatre of New York.
Nearly all children know their “Arabian Nights” and those in yesterday’s audiences were obviously familiar with the story of the poor tailor’s son who finds a magic lamp in a cave and discovers that merely by rubbing it he can summon a genie to do his bidding, endow him with untold wealth and countless slaves, and finally enable him to woo and win the beautiful daughter of the Sultan. They were delighted with the excellent characterizations of Wendell Whitten as Aladdin, Dorothy Slaytor as his mother, and Philippa Bevans as the lovely princess.
The play was handsomely costumed, and the settings by Irving Morrow did full justice to the Oriental legend of color and magnificence. The scenes at the Sultan’s palace, and in the palace of Aladdin, were especially well done. They were further livened by the dancing of Frances Porter, who played the role of Fatima, slave girl to the princess.
Others in the competent cast included Phyllis Marshall as Marjaneh, James Connerton as the Sultan, Ronald Kirk as the Gran Wazir, John O’Connor as the wicked magician, Aubrey Williams as Basim, James Reney as the Slave of the Ring, Stephen Courtleigh as the Slave of the Lamp, and Raye Long as another slave.
A musical program between the acts was presented by a string quintette from the Weltman Conservatory of Music of Malden. Artists were Ruth Potter, Myra Rawnsley, Camilla Werner-Swanson, Helen Donovan and Doris Sanford.
Girl Scouts from Oak Tree Troop, Lexington, who served as ushers at both performances, included Barbara Bond, Louise Carroll, Helen Collins, Audrey Emery, Barbara Ewing, Katherine Mara, Barbara Partridge, Ruth Schuh, Betty Thompson, Louise Whipple, Dorothy Winlock and Ann Wrightington.
Coffee was served in the foyer before and after the performances, with Mrs. Charles E. Parkhurst, Mrs. George S. Gibbs, Mrs. Frederick Dutton and Mrs. Henry Clark as pourers.

Price: $295.00

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